James Cave

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 62 total)
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  • in reply to: NI and NIF #20423
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Your UK national insurance number? I don’t know for sure but I would say this is very unlikely. You need a NIF to do most financial things in Portugal e.g. rent a house or open a bank account.

    in reply to: Portuguese Citizenship #20422
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Howie,

    Basically you would do everything in Portugal rather than in the UK.

    Tax-wise, if you applied for NHR, you would probably pay 10% tax on your pension. In terms of healthcare, you would have access to the Portuguese NHS as a resident. Many also pay for private insurance, which is more affordable here than in the UK. An income or capital gains you would need to pay tax on in Portugal, although some forms of income can be taxed abroad under the NHR scheme.

    in reply to: Moving to Portugal #20152
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Alex,

    I think you would need to apply for the D6 family reunification visa.

    https://www.portugalist.com/d6-family-reunification-visa/

    in reply to: D7 visa and criminal conviction #20151
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Clive,

    I’ll pass this question onto an immigration lawyer who will get in touch with you directly to answer this question.

    in reply to: retiring in Portugal #20080
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Lili,

    You didn’t mention who you have dual citizenship with, but I’m guessing it’s Portugal. You and your mother would not need a visa then, but your husband would need to come in on a family reunification visa off of your citizenship.

    This is a little complicated as normally, if you have the right to residency in Portugal, you would be financially responsible for that person. I will pass your details onto an immigration lawyer who can advise you on what’s best to do.

    in reply to: Portuguese working for UK company from Portugal #19720
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Well, as Portuguese passport holders you obviously don’t have to apply for residency. You can move back to Portugal easily.

    Yes, you can work remotely for a UK company in Portugal although you definitely should speak to your employers to make sure they’re okay with it. There may be payroll and other implications for them.

    Tax-wise, living in Portugal you would be tax resident here. Taxes in Portugal are higher than the UK, but you should be eligible for the NHR program which could be beneficial. See here: https://www.portugalist.com/nhr-tax-pensioners/

    I’ll put you in touch with a Portuguese company that can help with the PT side of things. There are also some UK things to consider, such as whether you want to continue making voluntary national insurance contributions while living in Portugal.

    in reply to: Is the D7 visa right for me? #19605
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Isa,

    It’s true that your age could be seen as a negative when submitting a business plan, but it could also be seen as a negative on the D7 too. SEF prefer other forms of income to savings, especially with younger applicants, as it would be very easy for you to either spend all of the money on a house or for your family to only be loaning it to you temporarily. So, it’s hard to say.

    If it’s okay with you, I’ll pass your details onto a relocation company that I work with here and they can better advise you!

    in reply to: Is the D7 visa right for me? #19587
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Isa,

    The D7 could be an option with those kinds of funds, but it sounds like the D2 is more what you’re looking for. The D2, or entrepreneur visa, is specifically for those that want to move to Portugal to set up a business and establishing a company as an investor would fall under that.

    The terms of the D2 are pretty similar to the D7 in terms of residency requirements (+6 months per year) and it sounds like this would suit you a lot better than the Golden Visa. As you point out, the GV is best for people who don’t really want to live in Portugal.

    Have a read of this article: https://www.portugalist.com/d2-visa-residency/

    in reply to: Residency and taxation #19558
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Alan,

    I’ll put you in touch.

    in reply to: 5 year temporary residency #19557
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Joe,

    If you were granted residency in Portugal a year ago, it’s still valid now and you can spend 4-5 months in Portugal as before.

    in reply to: close family obtaining residency #19541
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Ann,

    If he can prove he was living in Portugal (i.e. had rented a place) it may be possible for him to obtain residency on the pre-Brexit rules if he applies at his local camara before June. However, if he was living with you this may not count.

    Otherwise, he could look at the different residency visas available – https://www.portugalist.com/residency-visas/

    in reply to: Looking for small house to rent in the Lagos area #19510
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    You’re welcome 🙂

    in reply to: Looking for small house to rent in the Lagos area #19497
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Marc,

    It can sometimes be difficult to find long-term accommodation in Lagos as the town is so focused on tourism, but there are definitely options.

    Idealista is the main website to use for long-term lets and Facebook Marketplace is worth a look to.

    Also worth looking at:

    https://www.lagoslonglets.com/en/
    https://www.destination-algarve.com/long-term-rental/holidays-rentals-rentals-d0/

    in reply to: Residency/citizenship for USA early retiree? #19489
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Geographer,

    It sounds like the D7 visa could be a good option for you. It’s a visa/residency permit aimed at those who can sustain themselves on their own income such as a a pension or any form of retirement account.

    Your accounts combined would need to bring in at least €800-1000 per month, but the more, the better. Both savings and income are looked at, and it helps if you have 1-2 years worth of savings as well.

    That would put you on the path to citizenship after 5 years. You can also apply for NHR once you become resident in Portugal. On most funds that you can withdraw in retirement, the tax rate is a flat 10%.

    As for the driving licence, you would be able to register the Italian driving licence and continue to use it until it expires before you need to switch to a Portuguese one since it’s also from the EU.

    Here’s an article about the D7: https://www.portugalist.com/d7-visa-residency/

    in reply to: Tax advice for D7 remote worker #19415
    James Cave
    Keymaster

    Hi Mark,

    Will do.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 62 total)